Person:
Pinelli, Alfredo

Loading...
Profile Picture
First Name
Alfredo
Last Name
Pinelli
Affiliation
Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Faculty / Institute
Ciencias Matemáticas
Department
Area
Matemática Aplicada
Identifiers
UCM identifierDialnet ID

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 3 of 3
  • Publication
    Immersed boundary method for generalised finite volume and finite difference Navier-Stokes solvers
    (American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2010) Pinelli, Alfredo; Naqavi, I.Z.; Piomelli, U.
    In Immersed Boundary Methods (IBM) the effect of complex geometries is introduced through the forces added in the Navier-Stokes solver at the grid points in the vicinity of the immersed boundaries. Most of the methods in the literature have been used with Cartesian grids. Moreover many of the methods developed in the literature do not satisfy some basic conservation properties (the conservation of torque, for instance) on non-uniform meshes. In this paper we will follow the RKPM method originated by Liu et al. [1] to build locally regularized functions that verify a number of integral conditions. These local approximants will be used both for interpolating the velocity field and for spreading the singular force field in the framework of a pressure correction scheme for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. We will also demonstrate the robustness and effectiveness of the scheme through various examples.
  • Publication
    Control of the separated flow around an airfoil using a wavy leading edge inspired by humpback whale flippers
    (Elsevier France-editions Scientifiques Medicales Elsevier, 2012) Favier, J.; Pinelli, Alfredo; Piomelli, U.
    The influence of spanwise geometrical undulations of the leading edge of an infinite wing is investigated numerically at low Reynolds number, in the context of passive separation control and focusing on the physical mechanisms involved. Inspired by the tubercles of the humpback whale flippers, the wavy leading edge is modeled using a spanwise sinusoidal function whose amplitude and wavelength constitute the parameters of control. A direct numerical simulation is performed on a NACA0020 wing profile in a deep stall configuration (α=20°), with and without the presence of the leading edge waviness. The complex solid boundaries obtained by varying the sinusoidal shape of the leading edge are modeled using an immersed boundary method (IBM) recently developed by the authors [Pinelli et al., J. Comput. Phys. 229 (2010) 9073–9091]. A particular set of wave parameters is found to change drastically the topology of the separated zone, which becomes dominated by streamwise vortices generated from the sides of the leading edge bumps. A physical analysis is carried out to explain the mechanism leading to the generation of these coherent vortical structures. The role they play in the control of boundary layer separation is also investigated, in the context of the modifications of the hydrodynamic performances which have been put forward in the literature in the last decade.
  • Publication
    Immersed-boundary methods for general finite-difference and finite-volume Navier-Stokes solvers
    (Elsevier, 2010) Pinelli, Alfredo; Naqavi, I.Z.; Piomelli, U.; Favier, J.
    We present an immersed-boundary algorithm for incompressible flows with complex boundaries, suitable for Cartesian or curvilinear grid system. The key stages of any immersed-boundary technique are the interpolation of a velocity field given on a mesh onto a general boundary (a line in 2D, a surface in 3D), and the spreading of a force field from the immersed boundary to the neighboring mesh points, to enforce the desired boundary conditions on the immersed-boundary points. We propose a technique that uses the Reproducing Kernel Particle Method [W.K. Liu, S. Jun, Y.F. Zhang, Reproducing kernel particle methods, Int. J. Numer. Methods Fluids 20(8) (1995) 1081-1106] for the interpolation and spreading. Unlike other methods presented in the literature, the one proposed here has the property that the integrals of the force field and of its moment on the grid are conserved, independent of the grid topology (uniform or non-uniform, Cartesian or curvilinear). The technique is easy to implement, and is able to maintain the order of the original underlying spatial discretization. Applications to two- and three-dimensional flows in Cartesian and non-Cartesian grid system, with uniform and non-uniform meshes are presented.