Person:
Pinelli, Alfredo

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First Name
Alfredo
Last Name
Pinelli
Affiliation
Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Faculty / Institute
Ciencias Matemáticas
Department
Area
Matemática Aplicada
Identifiers
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Now showing 1 - 9 of 9
  • Publication
    Comparison between large-eddy simulation and Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes computations for the MUST field experiment. Part I: Study of the flow for an incident wind directed perpendicularly to the front array of containers
    (Springer, 2010) Santiago, J. L.; Dejoan, A.; Martilli, A.; Martin, F.; Pinelli, Alfredo
    The large-eddy simulation (LES) and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methodologies are used to simulate the air flow inside the container's array geometry of the Mock Urban Setting Test (MUST) field experiment. Both tools are assessed and compared in a configuration for which the incident wind direction is perpendicular to the front array. The assessment is carried out against available wind-tunnel data. Effects of including small geometrical irregularities present in the experiments are analysed by considering LES and RANS calculations on two geometries: an idealized one with a perfect alignment and an identical shape of the containers, and a second one including the small irregularities considered in the experiment. These effects are assessed in terms of the local time-mean average and as well in terms of spatial average properties (relevant in atmospheric modelling) given for the velocity and turbulent fields. The structural flow properties obtained using LES and RANS are also compared. The inclusion of geometrical irregularities is found significant on the local time-mean flow properties, in particular the repeated flow patterns encountered in a perfect regular geometry is broken. LES and RANS provide close results for the local mean streamwise velocity profiles and shear-stress profiles, however the LES predictions are closer to the experimental values for the local vertical mean velocity. When considering the spatial average flow properties, the effects of geometrical irregularities are found insignificant and LES and RANS provide similar results.
  • Publication
    Immersed boundary method for generalised finite volume and finite difference Navier-Stokes solvers
    (American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2010) Pinelli, Alfredo; Naqavi, I.Z.; Piomelli, U.
    In Immersed Boundary Methods (IBM) the effect of complex geometries is introduced through the forces added in the Navier-Stokes solver at the grid points in the vicinity of the immersed boundaries. Most of the methods in the literature have been used with Cartesian grids. Moreover many of the methods developed in the literature do not satisfy some basic conservation properties (the conservation of torque, for instance) on non-uniform meshes. In this paper we will follow the RKPM method originated by Liu et al. [1] to build locally regularized functions that verify a number of integral conditions. These local approximants will be used both for interpolating the velocity field and for spreading the singular force field in the framework of a pressure correction scheme for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. We will also demonstrate the robustness and effectiveness of the scheme through various examples.
  • Publication
    Comparison between large-eddy simulation and Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes computations for the MUST field experiment. Part II: effects of incident wind angle deviation on the mean flow and plume dispersion
    (Springer, 2010) Dejoan, A.; Santiago, J. L.; Martilli, A.; Martin, F.; Pinelli, Alfredo
    Large-eddy simulations (LES) and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computations of pollutant dispersion are reported for the Mock Urban Setting Test (MUST) field experiment flow. In particular we address the effects of incident wind angle deviation on the mean velocity and on the mean concentration fields. Both computational fluid dynamical methods are assessed by comparing the simulation results with experimental field data. The comparative analysis proposes to relate the plume deflection with the flow channelling effects. The results show that the plume deflection angle varies with the altitude. As the ground is approached the plume is shown to be almost aligned with the street canyon direction and independent of the incident wind directions considered. At higher altitudes well above the obstacles, the plume direction is aligned with the mean wind direction as in dispersion over flat terrain. The near-ground plume deflection is the consequence of a strong channelling effect in the region near the ground. The mean concentration profiles predicted by LES and RANS are both in good qualitative agreement with experimental data but exhibit discrepancies that can be partly explained by the influence of small incident wind angle deviation effects. Compared to RANS, LES predicts a higher channelling and thus a higher deflection of the plume. Results on the fluctuating intensity of the concentration obtained from LES show a satisfactory agreement with experiments. This information is not available from RANS for which only the mean concentration modelling is considered.
  • Publication
    Block tridiagonal solvers on heterogeneous architectures
    (IEEE, 2012) Valero Lara, P.; Pinelli, Alfredo; Favier, J.; Matías, M.P.
    Modern multi-core and many-core systems offer a very impressive cost/performance ratio. In this paper a set of new parallel implementations for the solution of linear systems with block-tridiagonal coefficient matrix on current parallel architectures is proposed and evaluated: one of them on multi-core, others on many-core and finally, a new heterogeneous implementation on both architectures. The results show a speedup higher than 6 on certain parts of the problem, being the heterogeneous implementation the fastest.
  • Publication
    Turbulence-and buoyancy-driven secondary flow in a horizontal square duct heated from below
    (American Institute of Physics, 2011) Sekimoto, Atshushi; Kawahara, Genta; Sekiyama, K.; Uhlmann, Markus; Pinelli, Alfredo
    Direct numerical simulations of fully developed turbulent flows in a horizontal square duct heated from below are performed at bulk Reynolds numbers Re(b) = 3000 and 4400 (based on duct width H) and bulk Richardson numbers 0 <= Ri <= 1.03. The primary objective of the numerical simulations concerns the characterization of the mean secondary flow that develops in this class of flows. On one hand, it is known that turbulent isothermal flow in a square duct presents secondary mean motions of Prandtl's second kind that finds its origin in the behavior of turbulence structures. On the other hand, thermal convection drives a mean secondary motion of Prandtl's first kind directly induced by buoyancy. As far as the mean structure of the cross-stream motion is concerned, it is found that different types of secondary flow regimes take place when increasing the value of the Richardson number. The mean secondary flow in the range 0.025 less than or similar to Ri less than or similar to 0.25 is characterized by a single large-scale thermal convection roll and four turbulence-driven corner vortices of the opposite sense of rotation to the roll, as contrasted with the classical scenario of the eight-vortex secondary flow pattern typical of isothermal turbulent square-duct flow. This remarkable structural difference in the corner regions can be interpreted in terms of combined effects, on instantaneous streamwise vortices, of the large-scale circulation and of the geometrical constraint by the duct corner. When further increasing the Richardson number, i.e., Ri greater than or similar to 0.25, the structure of the mean secondary flow is solely determined by the large-scale circulation induced by the buoyancy force. In this regime, the additional mean cross-stream motion is characterized by the presence of two distinct buoyancy-driven vortices of opposite sense of rotation to the circulation only in two of the four corner regions. With increasing Ri, the large-scale circulation is found to enhance the wall skin friction and heat transfer. In the significant-buoyancy regime Ri greater than or similar to 0.25, the mean cross-stream motion and its rms fluctuations are found to scale, respectively, with the buoyancy-induced velocity u(g)=root g beta Delta TH (g, beta, and Delta T being the gravity acceleration, the volumetric coefficient of thermal expansion, and the temperature difference across the duct, respectively) and with the mixed velocity scale root(nu/H)u(g) (nu being the kinematic viscosity). It is suggested that the probable scalings for the rms of streamwise velocity component and of temperature fluctuation are related with the friction velocity u(tau) and friction temperature T(tau) according to the magnitudes u(tau)(2)/ and T(tau)u(tau)/root(nu/H)u(g), respectively.
  • Publication
    Travelling-waves consistent with turbulence-driven secondary flow in a square duct
    (American Institute of Physics, 2010) Uhlmann, Markus; Kawahara, Genta; Pinelli, Alfredo
    We present numerically determined travelling-wave solutions for pressure-driven flow through a straight duct with a square cross-section. This family of solutions represents typical coherent structures (a staggered array of counter-rotating streamwise vortices and an associated low-speed streak) on each wall. Their streamwise average flow in the cross-sectional plane corresponds to an eight vortex pattern much alike the secondary flow found in the turbulent regime.
  • Publication
    Control of the separated flow around an airfoil using a wavy leading edge inspired by humpback whale flippers
    (Elsevier France-editions Scientifiques Medicales Elsevier, 2012) Favier, J.; Pinelli, Alfredo; Piomelli, U.
    The influence of spanwise geometrical undulations of the leading edge of an infinite wing is investigated numerically at low Reynolds number, in the context of passive separation control and focusing on the physical mechanisms involved. Inspired by the tubercles of the humpback whale flippers, the wavy leading edge is modeled using a spanwise sinusoidal function whose amplitude and wavelength constitute the parameters of control. A direct numerical simulation is performed on a NACA0020 wing profile in a deep stall configuration (α=20°), with and without the presence of the leading edge waviness. The complex solid boundaries obtained by varying the sinusoidal shape of the leading edge are modeled using an immersed boundary method (IBM) recently developed by the authors [Pinelli et al., J. Comput. Phys. 229 (2010) 9073–9091]. A particular set of wave parameters is found to change drastically the topology of the separated zone, which becomes dominated by streamwise vortices generated from the sides of the leading edge bumps. A physical analysis is carried out to explain the mechanism leading to the generation of these coherent vortical structures. The role they play in the control of boundary layer separation is also investigated, in the context of the modifications of the hydrodynamic performances which have been put forward in the literature in the last decade.
  • Publication
    Immersed-boundary methods for general finite-difference and finite-volume Navier-Stokes solvers
    (Elsevier, 2010) Pinelli, Alfredo; Naqavi, I.Z.; Piomelli, U.; Favier, J.
    We present an immersed-boundary algorithm for incompressible flows with complex boundaries, suitable for Cartesian or curvilinear grid system. The key stages of any immersed-boundary technique are the interpolation of a velocity field given on a mesh onto a general boundary (a line in 2D, a surface in 3D), and the spreading of a force field from the immersed boundary to the neighboring mesh points, to enforce the desired boundary conditions on the immersed-boundary points. We propose a technique that uses the Reproducing Kernel Particle Method [W.K. Liu, S. Jun, Y.F. Zhang, Reproducing kernel particle methods, Int. J. Numer. Methods Fluids 20(8) (1995) 1081-1106] for the interpolation and spreading. Unlike other methods presented in the literature, the one proposed here has the property that the integrals of the force field and of its moment on the grid are conserved, independent of the grid topology (uniform or non-uniform, Cartesian or curvilinear). The technique is easy to implement, and is able to maintain the order of the original underlying spatial discretization. Applications to two- and three-dimensional flows in Cartesian and non-Cartesian grid system, with uniform and non-uniform meshes are presented.
  • Publication
    Interaction of multiple flapping filaments for cylinder wake modification using the Lattice Boltzmann Method
    (2012) Revell, A.; Favier, J.; Pinelli, Alfredo
    This paper introduces the recent work undertaken on the development of a code based on the combination of the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) with a recent version of the Immersed Boundary Method (IBM). The code is first validated against existing results, before being applied to investigate the different modes of flapping behaviour for single and multiple filaments at various separation distances. The work proceeds to investigate the cylinder wake modification for moderate Reynolds number when groups of said filaments are attached to the ley-side of a circular cylinder.