Person:
García Álvarez, Yolanda

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First Name
Yolanda
Last Name
García Álvarez
Affiliation
Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Faculty / Institute
Enfermería, Fisioterapia y Podología
Department
Enfermería
Area
Enfermería
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Search Results

Now showing 1 - 5 of 5
  • Publication
    Differences in the Sub-Metatarsal Fat Pad Atrophy Symptoms between Patients with Metatarsal Head Resection and Those without Metatarsal Head Resection: A Cross-Sectional Study
    (MDPI, 2020-03-14) Molines Barroso, Raúl Juan; García Álvarez, Yolanda; García-Klepzig, José Luis; García Morales, Esther Alicia; Álvaro Afonso, Francisco Javier; Lázaro Martínez, José Luis
    We aimed to evaluate the differences in the sub-metatarsal skin and fat pad atrophy between patients at a high risk of ulceration with and without previous metatarsal head resection. A cross-sectional study was performed in a diabetic foot unit involving 19 participants with a history of metatarsal head resection (experimental group) and 19 (control group) without a history of metatarsal head resection but with an ulcer in other locations in the metatarsal head. No participants had active ulcerations at study inclusion. Sub-metatarsal skin thickness and fat pad thickness in the first and second metatarsals were evaluated by an ultrasound transducer. The experimental group showed sub-metatarsal fat pad atrophy (3.74 ± 1.18 mm and 2.52 ± 1.04 mm for first and second metatarsal, respectively) compared with the control group (5.44 ± 1.12 mm and 4.73 ± 1.59 mm) (p < 0.001, confidence interval: (CI): 0.943–2.457 and p < 0.001, CI: 1.143–3.270 for first and second metatarsal, respectively); however, sub-metatarsal skin thickness was not different between groups (experimental 2.47 ± 0.47 mm vs. control 2.80 ± 0.58 mm (p = 0.063, CI: −0.019–0.672) and 2.24 ± 0.60 mm vs. 2.62 ± 0.50 mm (p = 0.066, CI: −0.027–0.786) for first and second metatarsal, respectively). Patients with previous metatarsal head resection showed sub-metatarsal fat pad atrophy, which could be associated with the risk of reulceration in the metatarsal head.
  • Publication
    The Influence of Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria on Clinical Outcomes of Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Systematic Review
    (MPDI, 2021-05-01) Matta Gutiérrez, Gianmarco; García Morales, Esther Alicia; García Álvarez, Yolanda; Álvaro Afonso, Francisco Javier; Molines Barroso, Raúl Juan; Lázaro Martínez, José Luis
    Multidrug-resistant organism infections have become important in recent years due to the increased prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers and their possible consequences. This study aimed to systematically review and evaluate ulcer duration, healing time, hospital stay, amputation, and mortality rates in patients with diabetic foot ulcers caused by infection with multidrug-resistant organisms. PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Web of Science were searched in May 2020 to find observational studies in English about the clinical outcomes of multidrug-resistant organism infection in diabetic foot ulcers. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria, and these studies included 923 patients. The overall methodological quality of the study was moderate. Ulcer duration was described in six studies, and there was no practical association with multidrug-resistant organisms. Two out of three studies reported a longer healing time in multidrug-resistant organism infections than in non-multidrug-resistant organism infections. Clinical outcomes included the duration of hospitalisation, surgeries, amputations, and deaths. Lower limb amputation was the most reported clinical outcome in the included studies, and was more prevalent in the multidrug-resistant organism infections. We concluded that there was not enough evidence that multidrug-resistant organisms hindered the healing of diabetic foot ulcers. In contrast to the clinical outcomes, multidrug-resistant organisms affect both amputation rates and mortality rates.
  • Publication
    Ultrasound-Assisted Wound (UAW) Debridement in the Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    (MPDI, 2022-03-30) Flores Escobar, Sebastián; Álvaro Afonso, Francisco Javier; García Álvarez, Yolanda; López Moral, Mateo; Lázaro Martínez, José Luis; García Morales, Esther Alicia
    A systematic review and meta-analysis were carried out to investigate the effect of ultrasound-assisted wound (UAW) debridement in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). All selected studies were evaluated using the Cochrane risk of bias tool to assess the risk of bias for randomized controlled trials. PubMed and Web of Science were searched in October 2021 to find randomized clinical trials (RCT) assessing the effect of UAW debridement on DFUs. RevMan v5.4. was used to analyze the data with the Mantel–Haenszel method for dichotomous outcomes. A total of 8 RCT met our inclusion criteria, with 263 participants. Concerning the healing rate comparing UAW versus the control group, a meta-analysis estimated the pooled OR at 2.22 (95% CI 0.96–5.11, p = 0.06), favoring UAW debridement, with low heterogeneity (x2 = 7.47, df = 5, p = 0.19, I2 = 33%). Time to healing was similar in both groups: UAW group (14.25 ± 10.10 weeks) versus the control group (13.38 ± 1.99 weeks, p = 0.87). Wound area reduction was greater in the UAW debridement group (74.58% ± 19.21%) than in the control group (56.86% ± 25.09%), although no significant differences were observed between them (p = 0.24). UAW debridement showed higher healing rates, a greater percentage of wound area reduction, and similar healing times when compared with placebo (sham device) and standard of care in patients with DFUs, although no statistically significant differences were observed between groups.
  • Publication
    Long-Term Complications after Surgical or Medical Treatment of Predominantly Forefoot Diabetic Foot Osteomyelitis: 1 Year Follow Up
    (MPDI, 2021-05-01) Tardaguila García, Aroa; García Álvarez, Yolanda; García Morales, Esther Alicia; López Moral, Mateo; Sanz Corbalán, Irene; Lázaro Martínez, José Luis
    Aim: To compare long-term complications according to the treatment received for management of diabetic foot osteomyelitis (surgical or medical) at 1 year follow up. Design and Participants: A prospective observational study was conducted involving 116 patients with diabetic foot osteomyelitis. The patients received surgical or medical treatment based on the principles described in the literature. To register the development of a complication, both groups of treatments were followed-up 1 year after the ulcer had healed. Results: Ninety-six (82.8%) patients received surgical treatment and 20 (17.2%) medical treatment. No differences were found in the time to healing between both groups of treatment, 15.7 ± 9.2 weeks in the surgical group versus 16.4 ± 12.1 weeks in the medical group; p = 0.103. During follow up, 85 (73.3%) patients developed complications without differences between both groups, 68 (70.8%) in the surgical group versus 17 (85%) in the medical group (p = 0.193). The most common complication in both groups was re-ulceration. We did not observe significant differences comparing complication-free time survival between both treatments (p = 0.665). Conclusion: The onset of complications after healing in patients who suffered from diabetic foot osteomyelitis was not associated with the treatment received. Surgical and medical approaches to the management of diabetic foot osteomyelitis produced similar results in long-term follow up.
  • Publication
    Analysis of Plantar Pressure Pattern after Metatarsal Head Resection. Can Plantar Pressure Predict Diabetic Foot Reulceration?
    (MPDI, 2021-05-24) García Madrid, Marta; García Álvarez, Yolanda; Álvaro Afonso, Francisco Javier; García Morales, Esther Alicia; Tardaguila García, Aroa; Lázaro Martínez, José Luis
    To evaluate the metatarsal head that was associated with the highest plantar pressure after metatarsal head resection (MHR) and the relations with reulceration at one year, a prospective was conducted with a total of sixty-five patients with diabetes who suffered from the first MHR and with an inactive ulcer at the moment of inclusion. Peak plantar pressure and pressure time integral were recorded at five specific locations in the forefoot: first, second, third, fourth, and fifth metatarsal heads. The highest value of the four remaining metatarsals was selected. After resection of the first metatarsal head, there is a displacement of the pressure beneath the second metatarsal head (p < 0.001). Following the resection of the minor metatarsal bones, there was a medial displacement of the plantar pressure. In this way, plantar pressure was displaced under the first metatarsal head following resection of the second or third head (p = 0.001) and under the central heads after resection of the fourth or fifth metatarsal head (p < 0.009 and p < 0.001 respectively). During the one-year follow-up, patients who underwent a metatarsal head resection in the first and second metatarsal heads suffered transfer lesion in the location with the highest pressure. Patients who underwent a minor metatarsal head resection (second–fifth metatarsal heads) showed a medial transference of pressure. Additionally, following the resection of the first metatarsal head there was a transference of pressure beneath the second metatarsal head. Increase of pressure was found to be a predictor of reulceration in cases of resection of the first and second metatarsal heads.