Person:
Fernández Barrenechea, José María

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First Name
José María
Last Name
Fernández Barrenechea
Affiliation
Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Faculty / Institute
Ciencias Geológicas
Department
Mineralogía y Petrología
Area
Cristalografía y Mineralogía
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Now showing 1 - 10 of 28
  • Publication
    Influence of grinding on graphite crystallinity from experimental and natural data: implications for graphite thermometry and sample preparation
    (Mineralogical Society (Great Britain), 2006) Crespo Feo, Elena; Luque del Villar, Francisco Javier; Fernández Barrenechea, José María; Rodas, Magdalena
    This paper examines the effects of shear stress on the structuralparameters that define the ‘crystallinity’ of graphite. The results show that highly crystalline graphite samples ground for up to 120 min do not undergo detectable changes in the three-dimensional arrangement of carbon layers but crystallite sizes (Lc and La) decrease consistently with increasing grinding time. Grinding also involves particle-size diminution that results in lower temperatures for the beginning of combustion and exothermic maxima in the differentialthermalanal ysis curves. These changes in the structuraland thermalcharacteristics of graphite upon grinding must be taken into account when such data are used for geothermometric estimations. Tectonic shear stress also induces reduction of the particle size and the Lc and La values of highly crystalline graphite. Thus, the temperature of formation of graphite according to structural as well as thermaldata is underestimated by up to 100ºC in samples that underwent the most intense shear stress. Therefore, application of graphite geothermometry to fluid-deposited veins where graphite is the only mineralfound should take into consideration the effect of tectonic shearing, or the estimated temperatures must be considered as minimum temperatures of formation only.
  • Publication
    Sources of Sr and S in Aluminum-Phosphate–Sulfate Minerals in Early–Middle Triassic Sandstones (Iberian Ranges, Spain) and Paleoenvironmental Implications for the West Tethys
    (SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology), 2013) Galán Abellán, Ana Belén; Alonso Azcárate, Jacinto; Newton, Robert J.; Bottrell, Simon H.; Fernández Barrenechea, José María; Benito Moreno, María Isabel; Horra del Barco, Raúl de la; López Gómez, José; Luque del Villar, Francisco Javier
    Aluminum-phosphate–sulfate (APS) minerals, formed during early diagenesis in relation to acid meteoric waters, are the main host of Sr and S in the Early–Middle Triassic continental sandstones of the Iberian Ranges (east of the Iberian Peninsula). The sources of these elements and the effects of paleoenvironmetal changes on these sources and on the formation of APS minerals during Early–Middle Triassic times, were established on the basis of Sr and S isotopic analyses. The S and Sr data (d34S V-CDT = +11 to +14% and 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7099–0.7247, respectively) can be interpreted as resulting from mixing of different sources. Strontium was sourced from the dissolution of pre-existing minerals like K-feldspar and clay minerals inherited from the source areas, causing high radiogenic values. However, the isotopic signal must also be influenced by other sources, such as marine or volcanic aerosol that decreased the total 87Sr/86Sr ratios. Marine and volcanic aerosols were also sources of sulfur, but the d34S was lowered by dissolution of pre-existing sulfides, mainly pyrite. Pyrite dissolution and volcanic aerosols would also trigger the acid conditions required for the precipitation of APS minerals. APS minerals in the study area are found mainly in the Cañizar Formation (Olenekian?–Aegian), which has the lowest 87Sr/86Sr ratios. The lower abundance of APS minerals in the Eslida Formation (Aegian–Pelsonian) may indicate change in the acidity of pore water towards more alkaline conditions, while the increased 87Sr/86Sr ratios imply decreased Sr input from volcanic activity and/or marine aerosol inputs during Anisian times. Therefore, the decrease in abundance of APS minerals from the Early to Middle Triassic and the variations in the sources of Sr and S are indicative of changes in paleoenvironmental conditions during the beginning of the Triassic Period. These changes from acid to more alkaline conditions are also coincident with the first appearance of carbonate paleosols, trace fossils, and plant fossils in the upper part of the Cañizar Formation (and more in the overlying Eslida Formation) and mark the beginning of biotic recovery in this area. The presence of APS minerals in other European basins of the Western Tethys (such as the German Basin, the Paris Basin and the southeastern France and Sardinia basins) could thus also indicate that unfavorable environmental conditions caused delay in biotic recovery in those areas. In general, the presence of APS minerals may be used as an indicator of arid, acidic conditions unfavorable to biotic colonization.
  • Publication
    Mechanical graphite transport in fault zones and the formation of graphite veins
    (Mineralogical Society (Great Britain), 2005) Crespo Feo, Elena; Luque del Villar, Francisco Javier; Fernández Barrenechea, José María; Rodas, Magdalena
    This paper describes a vein-shaped graphite occurrence in which, for the first time, the geological, mineralogical and isotopic evidence support its formation by physical remobilization of previously formed syngenetic graphite. The deposit studied is located in the Spanish Central System and it occurs along the contact between a hydrothermal Ag-bearing quartz vein and a graphite-bearing quartzite layer. The characteristics of this occurrence differ from those of fluid-deposited vein-type graphite mineralization in that: (1) graphite flakes are oriented parallel to the vein walls; (2) graphite crystallinity is slightly lower than in the syngenetic precursor (graphite disseminated in the quartzite); and (3) the isotopic signatures of both types of graphite are identical and correspond to biogenic carbon. In addition, the P-T conditions of the hydrothermal Ag-bearing quartz veins in the study area (P <1 kbar, and T up to 360ëC) contrast with the high degree of structural order of graphite in the vein. Therefore, physical remobilization of graphite can be regarded as a suitable alternative mechanism to account for some cases of vein-shaped graphite deposits. Such a mechanism would require a previous concentration of disseminated syngenetic graphite promoted, in this case, by the retrograde solubility of quartz. This process would generate monomineralic graphite aggregates enhancing its lubricant properties and permitting graphite to move in the solid state along distances in the range of up to several metres.
  • Publication
    Caracterización de la materia carbonosa grafitizada de las pizarras silúricas de San Ciprián- Hermisende (Zamora)
    (Sociedad Española de Mineralogía, 2009-09) Crespo Feo, Elena; Rodas, Magdalena; Arche, Alfredo; Fernández Barrenechea, José María; Wada, Hideki; Luque del Villar, Francisco Javier
  • Publication
    Shallow burial dolomitisation of Middle–Upper Permian paleosols in an extensional tectonic context (SE Iberian Basin, Spain): Controls on temperature of precipitation and source of fluids
    (Elsevier, 2011) Benito Moreno, María Isabel; Horra del Barco, Raúl de la; López Gómez, José; Fernández Barrenechea, José María; Luque del Villar, Francisco Javier; Arche, Alfredo
    This work is focused on carbonate paleosols developed in three stratigraphic sections (Landete, Talayuelas and Henarejos) of theMiddle–Late Permian Alcotas Formation in the SE Iberian Basin. The Alcotas Formation, of alluvial origin, was deposited in semi-connected half-grabens developed during the early stages of the Permian–Triassic rifting stage that affected the Iberian Basin. The studied sections were located in two of these half-grabens, the Henarejos section being much closer to the basin boundary fault than the other two sections. The mineralogy and texture of the carbonate precursor of paleosols in the three studied sections are not preserved because original carbonate is replaced by coarse crystals of dolomite and/or magnesite. Dolomite crystals are typically euhedral, displaying rhombohedral shapes and reddish luminescence, although in the Henarejos section dolomite displays non-planar boundaries and frequently saddle habit. Micas are deformed and adapted to dolomite crystals, which, in turn, are affected by stylolites, suggesting that dolomite precipitated before mechanical and chemical compaction. Carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of dolomite fromthe three sections showdifferent values (δ13CVPDB mean values=−6.7‰,−5.5‰ and −7.5‰; δ18OVPDB mean values=−4.0‰; –5.6‰and−8.2‰, at Landete, Talayuelas and Henarejos sections, respectively). The 87Sr/86Sr ratios are similar in the three sections yielding values between 0.71391 and 0.72213. The petrographic and geochemical features of dolomite in the three studied sections suggest precipitation fromsimilar fluids and during shallow burial diagenesis. Assuming that theminimum temperature for dolomite precipitation in the Henarejos sectionwas 60 °C (as suggested by the presence of non-planar saddle habit), and that the dolomitizing fluid had similar δ18O values at the three localities, then dolomite in the Talayuelas and Landete sections precipitated at temperatures around 16 and 25 °C cooler, respectively. In addition, the δ18OVSMOW values of the water from which dolomite precipitated would have ranged between −0.3 and −2.9‰. Dolomite is partially or totally replaced by non- to dark dull luminescent magnesite in the Landete and Talayuelas sections. Magnesite crystals are affected by stylolites, indicating that it precipitated before chemical compaction. The δ13C mean values are −6.5 and −6.0‰ and the δ18OVPDB mean values are −6.7 and −7.8‰, in the Landete and Talayuelas sections, respectively. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios of magnesite are similar in both sections yielding values between 0.71258 and 0.72508. This suggests that they probably precipitated from similar fluids during progressive burial and at higher temperatures than dolomites at the same sections. Assuming thatmagnesite precipitated froma fluid with similar δ18O values in both sections, then it had to precipitate at a temperature around 8 °C higher in Talayuelas than in the Landete section. Dolomitisation and magnesite precipitation probably occurred via reflux of saline to hypersaline brines from the overlying Mid-Late Triassic Muschelkalk and/or Keuper facies. The temperatures inferred for dolomite precipitation, however, are too high for shallow burial if a normal geothermal gradient is applied. Thus, it can be inferred that salinefluidswere heated as theyflowed through the syn-sedimentary extensional faults that controlledMiddle Permian to Middle Triassic sedimentation; consequently fluidswould have been at higher temperatures near the Henarejos area, which was closer to the basin boundary fault than at the Talayuelas and Landete areas, whichwere situated further away. This contention is in agreement with recent studies which demonstrate that an important thermal event took place during Late Triassic–Early Jurassic times in the Iberian Peninsula.
  • Publication
    Palaeoenvironmental significance of Late Permian palaeosols in the South-Eastern Iberian Ranges, Spain
    (Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2008) Horra del Barco, Raúl de la; Benito Moreno, María Isabel; López Gómez, José; Arche, Alfredo; Fernández Barrenechea, José María; Luque del Villar, Francisco Javier
    The Late Permian (Wuchiapingian) Alcotas Formation in the SE Iberian Ranges consists of one red alluvial succession where abundant soil profiles developed. Detailed petrographical and sedimentological studies in seven sections of the Alcotas Formation allow six different types of palaeosols, with distinctive characteristics and different palaeogeographical distribution, to be distinguished throughout the South-eastern Iberian Basin. These characteristics are, in turn, related to topographic, climatic and tectonic controls. The vertical distribution of the palaeosols is used to differentiate the formation in three parts from bottom to top showing both drastic and gradual vertical upwards palaeoenvironmental changes in the sections. Reconstruction of palaeoenvironmental conditions based on palaeosols provides evidence for understanding the events that occurred during the Late Permian, some few millions of years before the well-known Permian-Triassic global crisis.
  • Publication
    Geochemical markers of paleoenvironments, weathering, and provenance in Permian–Triassic terrestrial sediments
    (SEPM, 2020) Galán Abellán, Ana Belén; Fernández Barrenechea, José María; Horra del Barco, Raúl de la; Alonso Azcárate, Jacinto; Luque del Villar, Francisco Javier; Borruel Abadía, Violeta; López Gómez, José
    This study compares several geochemical factors (major and minor rare earth elements, Ti/Al ratios, and chemical index of alteration, CIA, values) in the Early Triassic Cañizar Formation (Fm) (Buntsandtein facies) of E Iberia with those of adjacent Middle Permian and Middle Triassic units (Alcotas and Eslida fms, respectively). According to significant differences detected, it seems that most geochemical perturbation occurred during the Early Triassic. Variations in Ti/Al ratios suggest changes in source areas between the studied units and even within the Cañizar Fm. These provenance changes correlate with successive tectonic pulses during the opening and development of the Iberian Basin, as they can be linked to major sedimentary surfaces and unconformities, as well as major sedimentological variations. Ti enrichment in the lower and middle part of the Cañizar Fm, together with high Sr and P concentrations, may be indicative of environmental alterations related to acid meteoric waters. Moreover, this acid alteration took place under arid conditions as reflected by CIA values, indicating that during the deposition of the Cañizar Fm, variable but predominantly physical weathering prevailed in contrast to the chemical weathering that took place when the Alcotas and Eslida formations were deposited. Our data along with the known fossil record of the study area indicate that during the Middle–Late Permian and Early Triassic, conditions in this tectonically active area changed from humid to arid-acid, hampering biotic recovery. Then, during late Early–Middle Triassic times, the return of more humid and less acid environments promoted biotic development. Geochemical markers emerged as useful tools complementary to sedimentological, paleontological, and tectonic data for unveiling paleoenvironmental events, especially in a setting of significant regional change.
  • Publication
    Late Permian continental sediments in the SE Iberian Ranges, eastern Spain: Petrological and mineralogical characteristics and palaeoenvironmental significance
    (Elsevier, 2005) Benito Moreno, María Isabel; Horra del Barco, Raúl de la; Fernández Barrenechea, José María; López Gómez, José; Rodas, Magdalena; Alonso Azcárate, Jacinto; Arche, Alfredo; Luque del Villar, Francisco Javier
    A detailed mineralogical and petrological study and the analysis of paleosol profiles in continental alluvial sediments of the Late Permian in the SE Iberian Ranges (Spain) allow us to infer the significant environmental changes that occurred during this time period. Three parts have been distinguished in the Late Permian sediments (Alcotas Formation). The lower part includes abundant and well-preserved carbonate paleosol profiles and fine-grained sediments made up by quartz, feldspar, hematite and illite, with scarce kaolinite. The preservation of dolomicrite in some paleosols suggests that they originally developed as dolocretes in an arid to semi-arid climate with marked seasonality. A change towards more humid and acid conditions can be deduced from the presence of siderite and goethite in paleosols in the middle part of the Alcotas Formation. Moreover, the presence of plant remains, coal beds and/or carbonaceous shales at the top of the middle part, and the lack of carbonate paleosols in the upper part of the formation would indicate a further step towards acid conditions. These conditions would increase until the Early Triassic, as indicated by the lack of carbonates and the presence of Sr-rich aluminium phosphate sulphates (APS minerals) at the base of the Triassic (Can˜ izar Formation), which clearly indicates extreme acid conditions during the Permian–Triassic transition of the study area.
  • Publication
    First report of a Middle-Upper Permian magmatism in the SE Iberian Ranges: characterisation and comparison with coeval magmatisms in the western Tethys
    (Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 2012) Lago San José, Marceliano; Horra del Barco, Raúl de la; Ubide Garralda, Teresa; Galé, Carlos; Galán Abellán, Ana Belén; Fernández Barrenechea, José María; López Gómez, José; Benito Moreno, María Isabel; Arche, Alfredo; Alonso Azcárate, Jacinto; Luque del Villar, Francisco Javier; Timmerman, Martin J.
    A multiple basic to intermediate sill is reported for the first time in the south-eastern Iberian Ranges. It is composed of several tabular to irregular levels intercalated within the fluvial sediments of the Alcotas Formation (Middle-Upper Permian). The sill could represent the youngest Paleozoic subvolcanic intrusion in the Iberian Ranges. The igneous rocks are classified as basaltic andesites. They show a subophitic microstructure constituted by plagioclase (An62 – An6), augite (En48Wo44Fs7 –En46Wo39Fs15), pseudomorphosed olivine, minor amounts of oxides (magnetite and ilmenite)and accessory F-apatite. According to the mineralogy and whole-rock composition, their geochemical affinity is transitional from subalkaline to alkaline. Radiometric dating of the sill is not feasible due to its significant alteration. Field criteria, however, suggest an emplacement coeval to the deposition of the Alcotas Formation (Middle-Upper Permian). This hypothesis is supported by the transitional affinity of these rocks, similar to other Middle-Upper Permian magmatisms in the western Tethys, e.g., from the Pyrenees. Taking into account their isotopic signature (εSr: -6.8 to -9.2; εNd:+1.7 to +8.3), an enriched mantle source with the involvement of a HIMU component has been identified. This interpretation is supported by the trace element contents. Some of these HIMU characteristics have been recognised in the Middle-Upper Permian magmatisms of the Central Pyrenees (Anayet Basin) and the High Atlas (Argana Basin). However, none of these source features are shared with other Middle-Upper Permian magmatisms of the western Tethys (Catalonian Coastal Ranges, Corsica-Sardinia and southern France), nor with the Lower Permian magmatism of the Iberian Ranges. These differences support the presence of a heterogeneous mantle in the western Tethys during the Permian.
  • Publication
    Vein graphite deposits: geological settings, origin, and economic significance
    (Springer Science Business Media, 2014) Luque del Villar, Francisco Javier; Huizenga, Jan-Marten; Crespo Feo, Elena; Wada, Hideki; Ortega Menor, Lorena; Fernández Barrenechea, José María
    Graphite deposits result from the metamorphism of sedimentary rocks rich in carbonaceous matter or from precipitation from carbon-bearing fluids (or melts). The latter process forms vein deposits which are structurally controlled and usually occur in granulites or igneous rocks. The origin of carbon, the mechanisms of transport, and the factors controlling graphite deposition are discussed in relation to their geological settings. Carbon in granulite-hosted graphite veins derives from sublithospheric sources or from decarbonation reactions of carbonate-bearing lithologies, and it is transported mainly in CO2-rich fluids from which it can precipitate. Graphite precipitation can occur by cooling, water removal by retrograde hydration reactions, or reduction when the CO2-rich fluid passes through relatively low-fO2 rocks. In igneous settings, carbon is derived from assimilation of crustal materials rich in organic matter, which causes immiscibility and the formation of carbon-rich fluids or melts. Carbon in these igneous-hosted deposits is transported as CO2 and/or CH4 and eventually precipitates as graphite by cooling and/or by hydration reactions affecting the host rock. Independently of the geological setting, vein graphite is characterized by its high purity and crystallinity, which are required for applications in advanced technologies. In addition, recent discovery of highly crystalline graphite precipitation from carbonbearing fluids atmoderate temperatures in vein depositsmight provide an alternative method for the manufacture of synthetic graphite suitable for these new applications.