Person:
Vázquez Osorio, María Teresa

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First Name
María Teresa
Last Name
Vázquez Osorio
Affiliation
Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Faculty / Institute
Medicina
Department
Anatomía y Embriología
Area
Anatomía y Embriología Humana
Identifiers
UCM identifierORCIDScopus Author IDDialnet ID

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 8 of 8
  • Publication
    Elaboración de un manual de casos clínicos de anatomía radiológica aplicada de la extremidad inferior
    (2023-07-19) Aragonés Maza, Paloma; Maranillo Alcaide, Eva; Quiñones Garrido, Sara; Rodríguez Vázquez, José Francisco; Sañudo Tejero, José Ramón; Valderrama Canales, Francisco José; Vázquez Osorio, María Teresa; Viejo Tirado, Fermín
  • Publication
    Fat: Quality, or Quantity? What Matters Most for the Progression of Metabolic Associated Fatty Liver Disease (MAFLD)
    (MDPI, 2021-09-22) Estévez-Vázquez, Olga; Benedé-Ubieto, Raquel; Guo, Feifei; Gómez-Santos, Beatriz; Aspichueta, Patricia; Reissing, Johanna; Bruns, Tony; Sanz-García, Carlos; Sydor, Svenja; Bechmann, Lars P; Maranillo Alcaide, Eva; Sañudo Tejero, José Ramón; Vázquez Osorio, María Teresa; Lamas-Paz, Arantza; Morán, Laura; Mazariegos, Marina S; Ciudin, Andreea; Pericàs, Juan M.; Peligros, María Isabel; Vaquero, Javier; Martínez-Naves, Eduardo; Liedtke, Christian; Regueiro González-Barros, José Ramón; Trautwein, Christian; Bañares Cañizares, Rafael; Cubero Palero, Francisco Javier; Nevzorova, Yulia A.
    Objectives: Lately, many countries have restricted or even banned transfat, and palm oil has become a preferred replacement for food manufacturers. Whether palm oil is potentially an unhealthy food mainly due to its high content of saturated Palmitic Acid (PA) is a matter of debate. The aim of this study was to test whether qualitative aspects of diet such as levels of PA and the fat source are risk factors for Metabolic Syndrome (MS) and Metabolic Associated Fatty Liver Disease (MAFLD). Methods: C57BL/6 male mice were fed for 14 weeks with three types of Western diet (WD): 1. LP-WD—low concentration of PA (main fat source—corn and soybean oils); 2. HP-WD—high concentration of PA (main fat source—palm oil); 3. HP-Trans-WD—high concentration of PA (mainly transfat). Results: All types of WD caused weight gain, adipocyte enlargement, hepatomegaly, lipid metabolism alterations, and steatohepatitis. Feeding with HP diets led to more prominent obesity, hypercholesterolemia, stronger hepatic injury, and fibrosis. Only the feeding with HP-Trans-WD resulted in glucose intolerance and elevation of serum transaminases. Brief withdrawal of WDs reversed MS and signs of MAFLD. However, mild hepatic inflammation was still detectable in HP groups. Conclusions: HP and HP-Trans-WD play a crucial role in the genesis of MS and MAFLD.
  • Publication
    Atlas de anatomía radiológica correlacionado con imágenes de anatomía seccional. Tórax y Abdomen.
    (2019-04-23) Maranillo Alcaide, Eva; Vázquez Osorio, María Teresa; Sañudo Tejero, José Ramón; Viejo Tirado, Fermín; Navarro Collin, Cristina; Perez LLoret, Pilar; Arrazola, Juan; Marco, Fernando; Rodriguez Vázquez, José Francisco
    Es una herramienta de autoaprendizaje de las regiones anatómicas del tórax y el abdomen, bilingüe (español/inglés), dirigida a los estudiantes y profesionales de ciencias de la salud. Consiste en una serie de imágenes de resonancias magnéticas nucleares de tórax y abdomen, en las que aparecen marcadas, con un número, diferentes estructuras anatómicas para que el alumno piense y deduzca de qué estructura se trata. Las respuestas vienen dadas a continuación para que el alumno pueda proceder a su autoevaluación de forma inmediata, reforzando su aprendizaje. Esta herramienta de autoaprendizaje no es solo útil para que los alumnos aprendan y puedan preparar mejor las prácticas de anatomía y sus correspondientes exámenes prácticos, sino que también ayuda a los profesionales de las ciencias de la salud a adquirir los conocimientos anatómicos necesarios para poder interpretar, de forma correcta las RMN, técnica que cada vez tiene un mayor uso en la práctica clínica diaria.
  • Publication
    Anatomical study of the masseteric and obturator nerves: application to face transplant and reanimation procedures
    (Wiley, 2019-04-04) Lasso Vázquez, José María; Maranillo Alcaide, Eva; Martinez Pascual, Paula; Goñi, Ender; Vázquez Osorio, María Teresa; Sañudo Tejero, José Ramón; Pascual Font, Aran
    The masseteric nerve (MN) and the anterior branch of the obturator nerve (ON) that innervate the transferred gracilis muscle have proved highly efficient for reanimating paralyzed facial muscles when muscle transfer is required. Previous researchers have published the total axonal load for myelinated fibers in both nerves. However, the real motor axonal load has not been established. We performed the study on 20 MN and 13 ON. The segments of the MN and the ON were embedded in paraffin, sectioned at 10 μm, and stained following a standard immunohistochemical procedure using anti-choline acetyltransferase to visualize the motor fibers. The MN has a higher axonal load than the ON. There were statistically significant differences between the axonal load of the proximal segment of the MN and the ON. These findings confirm that end-to-end anastomoses between the MN and the ON should preferably use the proximal segment. However, MN neurotomy should ideally be performed between the proximal and distal segments, preserving innervation to the deep fascicles. Our results show that the MN is ideal as a donor motor nerve for reinnervating transplanted muscle for dynamic reanimation of the paralyzed face. The neurotomy should ideally be performed between the first and second collateral branches of the MN. Conclusion: These findings confirm that end-to-end anastomoses between the MN and the ON should preferably use the proximal and middle segments and the first branch itself and reveal that the MN is ideal as a donor motor nerve for reinnervating transplanted muscle for dynamic reanimation of the paralyzed face. However, the masseteric neurotomy should ideally be performed on the middle segment, preserving the innervation to the deep fascicles.
  • Publication
    External laryngeal nerve landmarks revisited
    (John Wiley & Sons medical publication, 2018-09-10) Ortega, Consuelo; Maranillo Alcaide, Eva; McHanwell, Steve; Sañudo Tejero, José Ramón; Vázquez Osorio, María Teresa
    Background: Because external laryngeal nerve (ELN) iatrogenic damage is frequent during neck surgery, its precise localization has been highly recommended. This study analyzes the different surgical landmarks previously proposed and the anatomy of the collateral and terminal branches of the ELN. Methods: The necks of 157 (77 men and 80 women) human adult embalmed cadavers were examined. The ELN origin, length, and relationship to different landmarks were recorded and results statistically compared with those previously reported. Results: The ELN is located deep to the ascending pharyngeal vein in 100% of patients. In most patients, it crosses the carotid axis at the thyroid artery origin level (47% of patients), passes medial to it (89% of patients), and shows an intramuscular trajectory through the inferior constrictor of the pharynx (80% of patients). Conclusion: The ELN position, in relation to classical landmarks, is highly variable. The most reliable relationships are those with the ascending pharyngeal vein or with the superior thyroid artery.
  • Publication
    The carotid axis revisited
    (Nature Publishing Group, 2021-05-07) Cobiella, R; Quinones, S; Konschake, Marko; Aragonés Maza, Paloma; Leon Vintró, Xavier; Vázquez Osorio, María Teresa; Sañudo Tejero, José Ramón; Maranillo Alcaide, Eva
    The aim was to determine the variations in the level of origin of carotid bifurcation and diameters of the common, internal, and external carotid arteries which is clinically important for several interventional procedures. Therefore, 165 human embalmed corpses were dissected. The data collected were analyzed using the Chi square-test and the Pearson correlation test. The results of previous studies have been reviewed. In relation to the level of the carotid bifurcation, taking as a reference point the hyoid bone, the values ranged from 4 cm below the hyoid body to 2.5 cm above the body of the hyoid, being the average height—0.33 cm, with a standard deviation of 1.19 cm. The right carotid bifurcation was established at a higher level (x = − 0.19 cm.) than the left one (x = − 0.48 cm.) (p = 0.046). On the contrary, no significant gender differences could be observed. The arterial calibres of the common and internal carotid arteries were higher in male than female. In the internal carotid artery (X = 0.76 cm.), the left was greater than the right (X = 0.72 cm.) (P = 0.047). However, no differences in the distribution of the calibre of the external carotid artery were found neither by side nor gender. Variations in the level of bifurcation and calibres of carotid arteries are relevant for interventional radiology procedures and head and neck surgeries. Knowledge of these anatomical references might help clinicians in the interpretation of the carotid system.
  • Publication
    Patterns of the circumflex femoral arteries revisited
    (Wiley, 2006-04-14) Vázquez Osorio, María Teresa; Murillo González, Jorge Alfonso; Maranillo Alcaide, Eva; Parkin, Ian; Sañudo Tejero, José Ramón
    Knowledge of variations of the circumflex femoral arteries is important when undertaking clinical procedures within the femoral region and in hip joint replacement. Since the 19th century, many different patterns have been proposed to classify their origins. This work studied a statistically reliable sample, the lower limbs of 221 embalmed human cadavers (equal right–left and approximately equal sex distributions), and reviewed the previous literature to propose a unified and simple classification that will be useful to clinicians. Statistical comparisons were made using the chi(2) test. The medial and lateral circumflex femoral arteries have been classified into three different patterns based on the levels of their origin. Distribution related to sex and side was also studied. Pattern I: Both arteries arose from the deep femoral artery (346 cases, 78.8%). This pattern was more frequent in females, P = 0.01. There was no significant difference between sides. Type Ia, medial circumflex femoral artery origin was proximal to the lateral circumflex femoral artery origin (53.2%); Type Ib, lateral circumflex femoral artery origin was proximal to medial circumflex femoral artery origin (23.4%); Type Ic, both arteries arose from a common trunk (23.4%). Pattern II: One of the arteries arose from the femoral artery and the other from the deep femoral artery (90 cases, 20.5%). Type IIa, the medial circumflex femoral artery arose from the femoral artery (77.8%) and Type IIb, the lateral circumflex femoral artery arose from the femoral artery (22.2%). There were no significant differences between sexes or sides. Pattern III: Both arteries arose from the femoral artery (2 cases, 0.5%). In every disposition there was a significantly higher prevalence of unilateral rather than bilateral occurrence. In one dissection the medial circumflex femoral artery was absent. Awareness of these variations could avoid unexpected injuries.
  • Publication
    Femoral nerve entrapment: A new insight
    (Wiley, 2006-03-31) Vázquez Osorio, María Teresa; Murillo González, Jorge Alfonso; Maranillo Alcaide, Eva; Parkin, Ian; Sañudo Tejero, José Ramón
    Compression of the femoral nerve in the iliac fossa has been reported as a consequence of several pathologies, but never as a result of muscular compression. Aberrant slips of iliacus, however, have occasionally been reported to cover or split the femoral nerve. This study aimed to assess such variations as potential factors in femoral nerve compression. A large and homogeneous sample of 121 embalmed cadavers (242 specimens) was studied. Statistical comparisons were made using the chi‐squared test. Muscular slips from iliacus and psoas, piercing or covering the femoral nerve, were found in 19 specimens (7.9%). No significant differences by sex or side were found. The more frequent variation was piercing of the femoral nerve by a muscular slip (17 specimens, 7.0%). The nerve then entered the thigh as one or more branches. The less frequent variation found was a muscular slip or sheet covering the femoral nerve as it lay on iliacus (2 specimens, 0.8%). Each disposition may be a potential risk for nerve entrapment.