Person:
Vázquez Osorio, María Teresa

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First Name
María Teresa
Last Name
Vázquez Osorio
Affiliation
Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Faculty / Institute
Medicina
Department
Anatomía y Embriología
Area
Anatomía y Embriología Humana
Identifiers
UCM identifierORCIDScopus Author IDDialnet ID

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 3 of 3
  • Publication
    External laryngeal nerve landmarks revisited
    (John Wiley & Sons medical publication, 2018-09-10) Ortega, Consuelo; Maranillo Alcaide, Eva; McHanwell, Steve; Sañudo Tejero, José Ramón; Vázquez Osorio, María Teresa
    Background: Because external laryngeal nerve (ELN) iatrogenic damage is frequent during neck surgery, its precise localization has been highly recommended. This study analyzes the different surgical landmarks previously proposed and the anatomy of the collateral and terminal branches of the ELN. Methods: The necks of 157 (77 men and 80 women) human adult embalmed cadavers were examined. The ELN origin, length, and relationship to different landmarks were recorded and results statistically compared with those previously reported. Results: The ELN is located deep to the ascending pharyngeal vein in 100% of patients. In most patients, it crosses the carotid axis at the thyroid artery origin level (47% of patients), passes medial to it (89% of patients), and shows an intramuscular trajectory through the inferior constrictor of the pharynx (80% of patients). Conclusion: The ELN position, in relation to classical landmarks, is highly variable. The most reliable relationships are those with the ascending pharyngeal vein or with the superior thyroid artery.
  • Publication
    Patterns of the circumflex femoral arteries revisited
    (Wiley, 2006-04-14) Vázquez Osorio, María Teresa; Murillo González, Jorge Alfonso; Maranillo Alcaide, Eva; Parkin, Ian; Sañudo Tejero, José Ramón
    Knowledge of variations of the circumflex femoral arteries is important when undertaking clinical procedures within the femoral region and in hip joint replacement. Since the 19th century, many different patterns have been proposed to classify their origins. This work studied a statistically reliable sample, the lower limbs of 221 embalmed human cadavers (equal right–left and approximately equal sex distributions), and reviewed the previous literature to propose a unified and simple classification that will be useful to clinicians. Statistical comparisons were made using the chi(2) test. The medial and lateral circumflex femoral arteries have been classified into three different patterns based on the levels of their origin. Distribution related to sex and side was also studied. Pattern I: Both arteries arose from the deep femoral artery (346 cases, 78.8%). This pattern was more frequent in females, P = 0.01. There was no significant difference between sides. Type Ia, medial circumflex femoral artery origin was proximal to the lateral circumflex femoral artery origin (53.2%); Type Ib, lateral circumflex femoral artery origin was proximal to medial circumflex femoral artery origin (23.4%); Type Ic, both arteries arose from a common trunk (23.4%). Pattern II: One of the arteries arose from the femoral artery and the other from the deep femoral artery (90 cases, 20.5%). Type IIa, the medial circumflex femoral artery arose from the femoral artery (77.8%) and Type IIb, the lateral circumflex femoral artery arose from the femoral artery (22.2%). There were no significant differences between sexes or sides. Pattern III: Both arteries arose from the femoral artery (2 cases, 0.5%). In every disposition there was a significantly higher prevalence of unilateral rather than bilateral occurrence. In one dissection the medial circumflex femoral artery was absent. Awareness of these variations could avoid unexpected injuries.
  • Publication
    Femoral nerve entrapment: A new insight
    (Wiley, 2006-03-31) Vázquez Osorio, María Teresa; Murillo González, Jorge Alfonso; Maranillo Alcaide, Eva; Parkin, Ian; Sañudo Tejero, José Ramón
    Compression of the femoral nerve in the iliac fossa has been reported as a consequence of several pathologies, but never as a result of muscular compression. Aberrant slips of iliacus, however, have occasionally been reported to cover or split the femoral nerve. This study aimed to assess such variations as potential factors in femoral nerve compression. A large and homogeneous sample of 121 embalmed cadavers (242 specimens) was studied. Statistical comparisons were made using the chi‐squared test. Muscular slips from iliacus and psoas, piercing or covering the femoral nerve, were found in 19 specimens (7.9%). No significant differences by sex or side were found. The more frequent variation was piercing of the femoral nerve by a muscular slip (17 specimens, 7.0%). The nerve then entered the thigh as one or more branches. The less frequent variation found was a muscular slip or sheet covering the femoral nerve as it lay on iliacus (2 specimens, 0.8%). Each disposition may be a potential risk for nerve entrapment.