Person:
Carracedo Rodríguez, Juan Gonzalo

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First Name
Juan Gonzalo
Last Name
Carracedo Rodríguez
Affiliation
Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Faculty / Institute
Óptica y Optometría
Department
Optometría y Visión
Area
Optica
Identifiers
UCM identifierORCIDScopus Author IDDialnet IDGoogle Scholar ID

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 10
  • Publication
    Signs and Symptoms of Dry Eye in Keratoconus Patients Before and After Intrastromal Corneal Rings Surgery
    (Taylor & Francis, 2017) Carracedo Rodríguez, Juan Gonzalo; Recchioni, Alberto; Alejandre Alba, Nicolás; Martín Gil, Alba; Batres Valderas, Laura; Jiménez Alfaro-Morote, Ignacio; Pintor, Jesús
    Purpose: Based on the relationship between keratoconus and dry eye, the aim of this study was to evaluate changes in signs and symptoms of dry eye in keratoconus patients before and after intrastromal corneal ring surgery. Methods: Fifteen keratoconus patients were enrolled in Fundación Jiménez-Díaz of Madrid and University Clinic of Optometry of the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Madrid, Spain). Tear break up time (TBUT), Schirmer test without anesthesia, corneal staining, diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A) concentration, and ocular surface disease index (OSDI) were evaluated. Impression cytology combined with laser confocal microscopy was performed to evaluate goblet cell density, mucin cloud height (MCH), and cell layer thickness (CLT). All measurements were performed before (pre) surgery, 1 month (post) and 6 months after surgery (post6m). Results: We found no statistical differences in time in Schirmer test, TBUT, and corneal staining. OSDI scores were 44.96  ±  8.65, 26.30 ± 6.79, and 19.31 ± 4.28 for (pre), (post), and (post6m) surgery, respectively (p < 0.001). Impression cytology showed a decrease in cell density at (post6m) compared with presurgery (47.36 ± 35.15 cells/mm2 and 84.88 ± 32.08 cells/mm2, respectively, p = 0.04). At post6m, the MCH increased compared with presurgery values (13.97 ± 4.26 µm and 6.77 ± 2.51 µm, respectively, p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant increase in CLT in time. Ap4A tear concentrations were lower post6m than presurgery (1.02  ±  0.65 and 2.56   ± 1.10  µM, respectively, p < 0.001). Conclusion: Intrastromal corneal ring surgery induces changes improving dry eye symptoms but no changes were found in signs of dry eye after surgery in keratoconus patients except for the MCH that increases drastically. More studies are needed to clarify the reason of its improvement.
  • Publication
    Signs and Symptoms of Dry Eye in Keratoconus Patients: A Pilot Study
    (Taylor & Francis, 2015-11) Carracedo Rodríguez, Juan Gonzalo; Recchioni, Alberto; Alejandre Alba, Nicolás; Martín Gil, Alba; Crooke, Almudena; Jiménez Alfaro-Morote, Ignacio; Pintor, Jesús
    Purpose: To compare signs and symptoms of dry eye in keratoconus (KC) patients versus healthy subjects. Methods: A total of 15 KC patients (KC group, n = 15 eyes) and 16 healthy subjects (control group, 16 eyes) were enrolled in this study. The Schirmer I test with no anesthetic, tear break-up time (TBUT), corneal staining characteristics, and ocular surface disease index (OSDI) scores were evaluated for both groups. Impression cytology, combined with/scanning laser confocal microscopy (LCM), was performed to evaluate goblet cell density, mucin cloud height (MCH), and goblet cell layer thickness (CLT). Finally, tear concentrations of di-adenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A) were assessed. Results were statistically analyzed using Shapiro–Wilk and non-parametric Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results: KC patients had lower tear volumes and greater corneal staining than did healthy subjects (p < 0.05). OSDI scores were 44.96 ± 8.65 and 17.78 ± 6.50 for the KC and control groups, respectively (p < 0.05). We found no statistically significant differences in TBUT between groups. Impression cytology revealed lower goblet cell densities in KC group patients versus control group subjects (84.88 ± 32.98 and 128.88 ± 50.60 cells/mm,2 respectively, p < 0.05). There was a statistically significant reduction in MCH and CLT in KC group patients compared with control group subjects. Ap4A tear concentrations were higher in KC group patients than in control group subjects (2.56 ± 1.10 and 0.15 ± 0.12 µM, respectively, p < 0.05). Conclusions: The parameters evaluated in this study indicate that KC patients suffer greater symptoms of dry eye and greater tear instability, primarily due to the decreased mucin production in their tears, than do healthy patients with no KC.
  • Publication
    The influence of rigid gas permeable lens wear on the concentrations of dinucleotides in tears and the effect on dry eye signs and symptoms in keratoconus
    (Elsevier, 2016-10) Carracedo Rodríguez, Juan Gonzalo; González-Méijome, José Manuel; Martín Gil, Alba; Carballo Álvarez, Jesús; Pintor, Jesús
    Purpose: To evaluate the signs and symptoms of dry eye and dinucleotide secretion in tears of keratoconus patients (KC) and the potential effect of rigid gas permeable (RGP) contact lens wear. Methods: Twenty-three KC patients and forty control subjects were enrolled in this study. Signs of dry eye including tear volume, tear stability and corneal staining along with symptoms were assessed using the McMonnies questionnaire. Tears were collected using Schirmer strips, and dinucleotide concentrations in collected tears measured using high pressure liquid chromatography. Values obtained in KC and controls were compared. The effect of contact lens wear in KC was also assessed. Results: KC eyes showed a significantly lower tear volume compared to controls, shorter tear break up time (TBUT), higher corneal staining and higher McMonnies dry eye questionnaire scores (p < 0.05). When compared with non-wearers, KC contact lens wearers showed significantly higher symptoms, lower Schirmer and TBUT values (p < 0.05). Concentration of Ap4A (0.695 ± 0.304 μM vs. 0.185 ± 0.178 μM) and Ap5A (0.132 ± 0.128 μM vs. 0.045 ± 0.036 μM) were higher in KC compared to controls (p < 0.001) and only Ap4A was statistically higher in RGP wearers compared to non-wearers (0.794 ± 0.478 μM vs. 0.417 ± 0.313 μM) (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Signs and symptoms of dry eye as well as concentrations of Ap4A and Ap5A were markedly increased in KC patients compared to controls. Moreover, Ap4A and symptoms of dry eye were statistically higher in RGP wearers compared to non-wearers. This seems to indicate that factors such as RGP contact lens wear might exacerbate the clinical condition of dry eye.
  • Publication
    Comparison Between Viscous Teardrops and Saline Solution to Fill Orthokeratology Contact Lenses Before Overnight Wear
    (Contact Lens Association of Ophthalmologists, Inc, 2018-09) Carracedo Rodríguez, Juan Gonzalo; Villa Collar, César; Martín Gil, Alba; Serramito Blanco, María; Santamaría, Leticia
    Objective: To compare, in terms of efficacy, the differences between the use of saline solution and a viscous artificial tear to fill the lens during the first month of orthokeratology wear. Methods: A pilot, double-masked, crossed, randomized, and prospective study was conducted. In this study, 20 subjects (14 males and 6 females) with a mean age of 16.29±6.22 years (range, 10–26) were fitted with orthokeratology contact lenses. For the study, nonpreserved 0.9% NaCl commercial saline solution (Avizor, Madrid, Spain) and nonpreserved artificial teardrops with 0.3% of hyaluronic acid (Ocudry 0.3%; Avizor, Madrid, Spain) were used. Corneal staining, tear break up time (TBUT), topography, refraction, visual acuity, and subjective comfort and vision with the visual analog scale (score from 0 to 10, being 10 better comfort and vision) were evaluated at 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month of contact lens wear. Results: The corneal staining was statistically greater in the saline group than in the Ocudry group for the first day and during 1 week of wear (P<0.05). Comfort was found to be statistically better, with Ocudry 0.3% than saline solution, being 7.17±1.94 and 6.37±1.63, for the first day, and 8.78±0.43 and 8.15±0.62 for the day 28, respectively (P<0.05). However, no differences were found for subjective vision scores, TBUT, spherical equivalent, best-corrected visual acuity and uncorrected visual acuity, and mean keratometry between groups for any visit (P>0.05). Conclusion: Viscous artificial tears improve the subjective comfort of patients and reduce the corneal staining, compared with saline solution during the orthokeratology lenses fitting process. However, no differences between solutions for the treatment efficacy, in vision and corneal topography, were found.
  • Publication
    Symptoms and Signs in Rigid Gas Permeable Lens Wearers During Adaptation Period
    (Contact Lens Association of Ophthalmologists, Inc., 2016-03-01) Carracedo Rodríguez, Juan Gonzalo; Martín Gil, Alba; Peixoto de Matos, Sofía C.; Abejón Gil, Pilar; Macedo de Araújo, Rute Juliana; González Méijome, José Manuel
    Objectives: To evaluate neophyte contact lens wearers' fitting to rigid gas permeable (RGP) contact lenses in terms of wearing time, tear volume, stability, corneal staining, and subjective ratings, over a 1-month period of time. Methods: Twenty-two young healthy subjects were enrolled for wearing RGP on a daily wear basis. The participants included in this study never wore contact lenses and showed a value under 10 in McMonnies Questionnaire. Contact Lens Dry Eye Questionnaire, Visual Analog Scales, Schirmer test, tear film break-up time (BUT), and corneal staining grading were performed. Follow-up visits were scheduled at 1, 7, 15, and 28 days. Results: Six subjects dropped out due to discomfort from the study before 1 month (27% of discontinuation rate). Successful RGP wearers (16 participants) achieved high levels of subjective vision and reported comfort scores of approximately 9 of 10 between 10 and 15 days. They reported wearing their lenses for an average of 10.12±2.43 hr after 1 month of wear. Conversely, unsuccessful wearers discontinued wearing the lenses after the first 10 to 15 days, showing comfort scores and wearing time significantly lower compared with the first day of wear. Schirmer test showed a significant increase at 10 days (P<0.001), and the BUT trends decreased after the first week of wear in unsuccessful group. Conclusions: Symptomatology related with dryness and discomfort, detected during the first 10 days of the adaptation, may help the clinician to predict those participants who will potentially fail to adapt to RGP lens wear.
  • Publication
    Differences in Dry Eye Questionnaire Symptoms in Two Different Modalities of Contact Lens Wear: Silicone-Hydrogel in Daily Wear Basis and Overnight Orthokeratology
    (Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2016-08) García Porta, Nery; Rico del Viejo, Laura; Martín Gil, Alba; Carracedo Rodríguez, Juan Gonzalo; Pintor, Jesús; González-Méijome, José Manuel
    Purpose. To compare the ocular surface symptoms and signs in an adult population of silicone-hydrogel (Si-Hy) contact lens (CL) wearers with another modality of CL wear, overnight orthokeratology (OK). Materials and Methods. This was a prospective and comparative study in which 31 myopic subjects were fitted with the same Si-Hy CL and 23 underwent OK treatment for 3 months. Dry eye questionnaire (DEQ) was filled in at the beginning of the study and then after 15 days, 1 month, and 3 months using each CL modality. The tear quality was evaluated with noninvasive tear break-up time. Tear production was measured with Schirmer test. Tear samples were collected with Schirmer strips being frozen to analyze the dinucleotide diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A) concentration with High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Results. After refitting with ortho-k, a reduction in discomfort and dryness symptoms at the end of the day (, ) was observed. No significant changes were observed in Ap4A concentration in any group. Bulbar redness, limbal redness, and conjunctival staining increased significantly in the Si-Hy group (, Kruskal–Wallis test). Conclusion. Discomfort and dryness symptoms at the end of the day are lower in the OK CL group than in the Si-Hy CL group.
  • Publication
    Short-term Effect of Scleral Lens on the Dry Eye Biomarkers in Keratoconus
    (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2016-02) Carracedo Rodríguez, Juan Gonzalo; Serramito Blanco, María; Martín Gil, Alba; Wang, Zicheng; Carballo Álvarez, Jesús; Pintor, Jesús
    Purpose: To evaluate the most important signs of dry eye, such as osmolarity, inflammation, and diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A) concentration before and after wearing scleral lenses for 8 h in keratoconus patients. Methods: A pilot, experimental, short-term study involved 26 keratoconus patients (average age, 36.95 ± 8.95 years). They voluntarily enrolled in the study at the Optometry Clinic of the Faculty of Optics and Optometry in the University Complutense of Madrid. They were divided into two groups: patients with intrastromal corneal ring, the ICRS group, and patients without ICRS, the keratoconus (KC) group. Ocular Surface Disease Index questionnaire, the Schirmer test without anesthesia, tear break-up time, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) concentration, osmolarity, and Ap4A concentration were evaluated before and after wearing a scleral lens for 8 h. Results: The patients wore the scleral lenses from 6 to 9 h, with a mean of 7.59 ± 0.73 h. The mean scleral lens sag for all patients was 4310 ± 166.31 μm, ranging from 4200 μm to 4800 μm. No significant changes in the Schirmer test and tear break-up time were found for either group. Ocular Surface Disease Index scores were statistically lower after wearing scleral lenses for both groups (p < 0.05). A significantly lower osmolarity and a significant rise of MMP-9 concentration after wearing scleral lenses were found in both groups (p < 0.05). Diadenosine tetraphosphate concentration was lower after wearing the scleral lens in the KC group (p < 0.05) but no significant difference was found for the ICRS group (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Short-term scleral lens wearing improves the symptomatology and some signs of dry eye, such as osmolarity and Ap4A concentration. The increase of MMP-9 concentration could be caused by tear film stagnation and use of preserved saline.
  • Publication
    Ocular Surface Temperature During Scleral Lens Wearing in Patients With Keratoconus
    (Contact Lens Association of Ophthalmologists, Inc., 2016-05) Carracedo Rodríguez, Juan Gonzalo; Wang, Zicheng; Serramito Blanco, María; Martín Gil, Alba; Carballo Álvarez, Jesús; Pintor, Jesús
    Objective: To evaluate the ocular surface temperature using an infrared thermography camera before and after wearing scleral lens in patients with keratoconus and correlate these results with the tear production and stability. Methods: A pilot, experimental, short-term study has been performed. Twenty-six patients with keratoconus (36.95+/-8.95 years) participated voluntarily in the study. The sample was divided into two groups: patients with intrastromal corneal ring (KC-ICRS group) and patients without ICRS (KC group). Schirmer test, tear breakup time (TBUT), and ocular surface temperature in the conjunctiva, limbus, and cornea were evaluated before and after wearing a scleral lens. Results: The patients wore the scleral lenses from 6 to 9 hours with average of 7.59+/-0.73 hours. No significant changes in Schirmer test and TBUT were found for both groups. No temperature differences were found between the KC-ICRS and the KC groups for all zones evaluated. There was a slight, but statistically significant, increase in the inferior cornea, temporal limbus, and nasal conjunctival temperature for KC-ICRS group and temporal limbus temperature decreasing for the KC group after wearing scleral lens (P<0.05). The conjunctiva and limbus temperature was statistically higher than the central cornea for both groups before and after scleral lenses wearing (P<0.05), but no difference in the peripheral cornea was found. No statistically significant differences in the central corneal temperature were found between the groups after scleral lens wearing (P>0.05). Conclusion: Scleral contact lens seems not to modify the ocular surface temperature despite the presence of the tear film stagnation under the lens.
  • Publication
    Post-lens tear turbidity and visual quality after scleral lens wear
    (Wiley, 2017-11) Carracedo Rodríguez, Juan Gonzalo; Serramito Blanco, María; Martín Gil, Alba; Wang, Zicheng; Rodríguez Pomar, Candela; Pintor, Jesús
    Background: The aim was to evaluate the turbidity and thickness of the post-lens tear layer and its effect on visual quality in patients with keratoconus after the beginning of lens wear and before lens removal at the end of eight hours. Methods: Twenty-six patients with keratoconus (aged 36.95 ± 8.95 years) participated voluntarily in the study. The sample was divided into two groups: patients with intrastromal corneal ring (ICRS group) and patients without ICRS (KC group). Distance visual acuity (VA), contrast sensitivity, pachymetry, post-lens tear layer height and post-lens tear layer turbidity (percentage area occupied and number of particles per mm2) were evaluated with optical coherence tomography before and after wearing a scleral lens. Results: A significant increase of turbidity was found in all groups assessed (p < 0.05). The number of particles per square millimetre was eight times higher after scleral lens wear than at the beginning of wearing the lens for all groups. VA decreases in all groups after scleral lens wear (p < 0.001). All patients showed a statistical diminishing of contrast sensitivity after scleral lens wear (p < 0.05). A significant correlation was found for both turbidity parameters with distance VA but no correlation between turbidity and post-lens tear layer thickness at the beginning was found (p > 0.05). A strong correlation in all groups between the post-lens tear layer at the beginning and differences of tear layer thickness between two measures was also found (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The VA decrease during the scleral lens wearing, filled with preserved saline solution, was due to the increasing post-lens tear layer turbidity.
  • Publication
    Dry Eye Treatment Based on Contact Lens Drug Delivery: A Review
    (Contact Lens Association of Ophthalmologists, 2016-09) Guzmán Aránguez, Ana Isabel; Fonseca, Begoña; Carracedo Rodríguez, Juan Gonzalo; Martín Gil, Alba; Martínez Águila, Alejandro; Pintor, Jesús
    Dry eye disease affects a substantial segment of the word population with increasing frequency. It is a multifactorial disease of the ocular surface and tear film, which causes ocular discomfort, visual disturbances, and tear instability with potential damage to the cornea and conjunctiva. Because of its multifactorial etiology, the use of different pharmacological treatment for dry eye treatment has been proposed, which include anti-inflammatory molecules, lubricants or comfort agents, and secretagogues. However, in some cases these pharmacological approaches only relieve symptoms temporarily, and consequently, eye care professionals continue to have difficulties managing dry eye. To improve pharmacological therapy that allows a more efficient and long-term action, effective ocular drug delivery of the currently available drugs for dry eye treatment is required. Contact lenses are emerging as alternative ophthalmic drugs delivery systems that provide an increased residence time of the drug at the eye, thus leading to enhanced bioavailability and more convenient and efficacious therapy. In this article, we reviewed the different techniques used to prepare contact lens-based drug delivery systems and focused on articles that describe the delivery of compounds for dry eye treatment through contact lenses.