Person:
Urbanos Garrido, Rosa María

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First Name
Rosa María
Last Name
Urbanos Garrido
Affiliation
Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Faculty / Institute
Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales
Department
Economía Aplicada, Pública y Política
Area
Economía Aplicada
Identifiers
UCM identifierORCIDScopus Author IDDialnet IDGoogle Scholar ID

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 3 of 3
  • Publication
    Decomposing socio-economic inequalities in leisure-time physical inactivity: The case of Spanish children
    (Springer Nature, 2016) Gonzalo Almorox, Eduardo; Urbanos Garrido, Rosa María
    Background: Physical inactivity is associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality and entails a substantial economic burden for health systems. Also, the analysis of inequality in lifestyles for young populations may contribute to reduce health inequalities during adulthood. This paper examines the income-related inequality regarding leisure-time physical inactivity in Spanish children. Methods: In this cross-sectional study based on the Spanish National Health Survey for 2011-12, concentration indices are estimated to measure socioeconomic inequalities in leisure-time physical inactivity. A decomposition analysis is performed to determine the factors that explain income-related inequalities. Results: There is a significant socioeconomic gradient favouring the better-off associated with leisure-time physical inactivity amongst Spanish children, which is more pronounced in the case of girls. Income shows the highest contribution to total inequality, followed by education of the head of the household. The contribution of several factors (education, place of residence, age) significantly differs by gender. Conclusions: There is an important inequity in the distribution of leisure-time physical inactivity. Public policies aimed at promoting physical activity for children should prioritize the action into the most disadvantaged subgroups of the population. As the influence of determinants of health styles significantly differ by gender, this study points out the need of addressing the research on income-related inequalities in health habits from a gender perspective.
  • Publication
    The influence of the economic crisis on the association between unemployment and health: an empirical analysis for Spain
    (Springer Verlag, 2015-03) Urbanos Garrido, Rosa María; Lopez Valcarcel, Beatriz G.
    To estimate the impact of (particularly longterm) unemployment on the overall and mental health of the Spanish working-age population and to check whether the effects of unemployment on health have increased or been tempered as a consequence of the economic crisis. Methods We apply a matching technique to cross-sectional microdata from the Spanish Health Survey for the years 2006 and 2011–2012 to estimate the average treatment effect of unemployment on self-assessed health (SAH) in the last year, mental problems in the last year and on the mental health risk in the short term. We also use a differences-in-differences estimation method between the two periods to check if the impact of unemployment on health depends on the economic context.
  • Publication
    Changes in income-related inequalities in cervical cancer screening during the Spanish economic crisis: a decomposition analysis
    (Springer Nature, 2018) Merino-Ventosa, María; Urbanos Garrido, Rosa María
    Background: Cervical cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers, but it may be prevented by early detection. Social inequalities in the use of cytology testing have been identified in the literature. However, the degree of income-related inequality has not been quantified and determinants of inequality changes during the economic crisis remain unknown. Methods: Using the Spanish National Health Surveys (2006–07 / 2011–12), we analyzed how income-related inequalities in the use of cervical cancer screening for women aged 25–64 changed across the economic crisis. We used corrected concentration indices (CCI) which were further decomposed in order to compute the contribution of the explanatory variables. An Oaxaca-type approach was employed to investigate the origin of changes over time. Results: Our final sample consisted of 10,743 observations in 2006–07 and 6587 in 2011–12. Despite the higher prevalence of screening over time (from 73.9 to 77.9%), pro-rich inequality significantly increased (from CCI = 0.1726 to CCI = 0.1880, p < 0.001). Income was the main determinant of inequality in cervical screening, although its contribution decreased over time, as well as the contribution of the type of health insurance, mainly due to changes in elasticity. Other factors, such as nationality or the educational level, seem to have played an important role in the increase of pro-rich inequality of cytology testing. Conclusions: Reducing cervical screening inequalities would require actions focused on most vulnerable groups such as migrants, low income and low educated population. The implementation of population-based screening programs would also help to cope with income-related inequalities in cytology testing.