Person:
García Álvarez, Yolanda

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First Name
Yolanda
Last Name
García Álvarez
Affiliation
Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Faculty / Institute
Enfermería, Fisioterapia y Podología
Department
Enfermería
Area
Enfermería
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Search Results

Now showing 1 - 4 of 4
  • Publication
    Differences in the Sub-Metatarsal Fat Pad Atrophy Symptoms between Patients with Metatarsal Head Resection and Those without Metatarsal Head Resection: A Cross-Sectional Study
    (MDPI, 2020-03-14) Molines Barroso, Raúl Juan; García Álvarez, Yolanda; García-Klepzig, José Luis; García Morales, Esther Alicia; Álvaro Afonso, Francisco Javier; Lázaro Martínez, José Luis
    We aimed to evaluate the differences in the sub-metatarsal skin and fat pad atrophy between patients at a high risk of ulceration with and without previous metatarsal head resection. A cross-sectional study was performed in a diabetic foot unit involving 19 participants with a history of metatarsal head resection (experimental group) and 19 (control group) without a history of metatarsal head resection but with an ulcer in other locations in the metatarsal head. No participants had active ulcerations at study inclusion. Sub-metatarsal skin thickness and fat pad thickness in the first and second metatarsals were evaluated by an ultrasound transducer. The experimental group showed sub-metatarsal fat pad atrophy (3.74 ± 1.18 mm and 2.52 ± 1.04 mm for first and second metatarsal, respectively) compared with the control group (5.44 ± 1.12 mm and 4.73 ± 1.59 mm) (p < 0.001, confidence interval: (CI): 0.943–2.457 and p < 0.001, CI: 1.143–3.270 for first and second metatarsal, respectively); however, sub-metatarsal skin thickness was not different between groups (experimental 2.47 ± 0.47 mm vs. control 2.80 ± 0.58 mm (p = 0.063, CI: −0.019–0.672) and 2.24 ± 0.60 mm vs. 2.62 ± 0.50 mm (p = 0.066, CI: −0.027–0.786) for first and second metatarsal, respectively). Patients with previous metatarsal head resection showed sub-metatarsal fat pad atrophy, which could be associated with the risk of reulceration in the metatarsal head.
  • Publication
    The Influence of Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria on Clinical Outcomes of Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Systematic Review
    (MPDI, 2021-05-01) Matta Gutiérrez, Gianmarco; García Morales, Esther Alicia; García Álvarez, Yolanda; Álvaro Afonso, Francisco Javier; Molines Barroso, Raúl Juan; Lázaro Martínez, José Luis
    Multidrug-resistant organism infections have become important in recent years due to the increased prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers and their possible consequences. This study aimed to systematically review and evaluate ulcer duration, healing time, hospital stay, amputation, and mortality rates in patients with diabetic foot ulcers caused by infection with multidrug-resistant organisms. PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Web of Science were searched in May 2020 to find observational studies in English about the clinical outcomes of multidrug-resistant organism infection in diabetic foot ulcers. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria, and these studies included 923 patients. The overall methodological quality of the study was moderate. Ulcer duration was described in six studies, and there was no practical association with multidrug-resistant organisms. Two out of three studies reported a longer healing time in multidrug-resistant organism infections than in non-multidrug-resistant organism infections. Clinical outcomes included the duration of hospitalisation, surgeries, amputations, and deaths. Lower limb amputation was the most reported clinical outcome in the included studies, and was more prevalent in the multidrug-resistant organism infections. We concluded that there was not enough evidence that multidrug-resistant organisms hindered the healing of diabetic foot ulcers. In contrast to the clinical outcomes, multidrug-resistant organisms affect both amputation rates and mortality rates.
  • Publication
    Clinical efficacy of therapeutic footwear with a rigid rocker sole in the prevention of recurrence in patients with diabetes mellitus and diabetic polineuropathy: A randomized clinical trial
    (Public Library Science, 2019-07-11) López Moral, Mateo; Lázaro Martínez, José Luis; García Morales, Esther Alicia; García Álvarez, Yolanda; Álvaro Afonso, Francisco Javier; Molines Barroso, Raúl Juan
    Background: Therapeutic footwear becomes the first treatment line in the prevention of diabetic foot ulcer and future complications of diabetes. Previous studies and the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot have described therapeutic footwear as a protective factor to reduce the risk of re-ulceration. In this study, we aimed to analyze the efficacy of a rigid rocker sole to reduce the recurrence rate of plantar ulcers in patients with diabetic foot. Methods: Between June 2016 and December 2017, we conducted a randomized controlled trial in a specialized diabetic foot unit. Participants and intervention: Fifty-one patients with diabetic neuropathy who had a recently healed plantar ulcer were randomized consecutively into the following two groups: therapeutic footwear with semi-rigid sole (control) or therapeutic footwear with a rigid rocker sole (experimental). All patients included in the study were followed up for 6 months (one visit each 30 ± 2 days) or until the development of a recurrence event. Main outcome and measure: Primary outcome measure was recurrence of ulcers in the plantar aspect of the foot. Findings: A total of 51 patients were randomized to the control and experimental groups. The median follow-up time was 26 [IQR-4.4-26.1] weeks for both groups. On an intention-to-treat basis, 16 (64%) and 6 (23%) patients in the control and experimental groups had ulcer recurrence, respectively. Among the group with >60% adherence to therapeutic footwear, multivariate analysis showed that the rigid rocker sole improved ulcer recurrence-free survival time in diabetes patients with polyneuropathy and DFU history (P = 0.019; 95% confidence interval, 0.086-0.807; hazard ratio, 0.263). Conclusions: We recommend the use of therapeutic footwear with a rigid rocker sole in patients with diabetes with polyneuropathy and history of diabetic foot ulcer to reduce the risk of plantar ulcer recurrence. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02995863.
  • Publication
    Advantages of early diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy in the prevention of diabetic foot ulcers
    (Elsevier, 2018-12) Sanz Corbalán, Irene; Lázaro Martínez, José Luis; García Morales, Esther Alicia; Molines Barroso, Raúl Juan; Álvaro Afonso, Francisco Javier; García Álvarez, Yolanda
    Aims: To evaluate the utility of the sudomotor function test (SFT) as a clinical tool in the Risk Stratification System of diabetic patients and to demonstrate the earlier detection of the risk of developing diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) compared to the standard clinical tests. Methods: Prospective follow-up study on 263 patients enrolled consecutively over 3.5 years. Diabetic patients without active DFU were classified according to the International Working Group Risk Stratification System (RSS) and categorized according to the results of the Semmes-Wenstein Monofilament (SWM) and biothesiometer measurements or the SFT. The main outcome evaluated was the development of DFU. Results: Median follow-up was 42 [38-44] months. Sixty patients (22.8%) developed DFU after a median of 6.2 [3-17] months. Ten patients that were included in the no-risk group (group 0) based on the SWM and biothesiometer results developed DFU. Thus the sensitivity of this approach was 83.33% and the specificity was 50.47%. Based on the SFT results, all patients that developed DFU were included in the correct risk group. This approach had 100% sensitivity and 31.53% specificity. Regarding the diagnostic accuracy of the two Methods, the respective AUC values were 0.776 (95% CI 0.702-0.849) and 0.816 (95% CI 0.757-0.874). Conclusions: SFT improved RSS in diabetic patients in a specialized diabetic foot unit. SFT categorized patients correctly according to the risk of developing DFU.