Person:
Mazariegos Martínez-Peñalver, María

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First Name
María
Last Name
Mazariegos Martínez-Peñalver
Affiliation
Universidad Complutense de Madrid
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Now showing 1 - 3 of 3
  • Publication
    Gene expression profile suggests that pigs (Sus scrofa) are susceptible to Anaplasma phagocytophilum but control infection
    (BioMedCentral, 2012-08-30) Galindo, Ruth C; Ayllón, Nieves; Smrdel, Katja Strašek; Boadella, Mariana; Beltrán-Beck, Beatriz; Mazariegos Martínez-Peñalver, María; García Benzaquén, Nerea; de la Lastra, José M Pérez; Avsic-Zupanc, Tatjana; Kocan, Katherine M; Gortazar, Christian; de la Fuente, José
    BACKGROUND Anaplasma phagocytophilum infects a wide variety of hosts and causes granulocytic anaplasmosis in humans, horses and dogs and tick-borne fever in ruminants. Infection with A. phagocytophilum results in the modification of host gene expression and immune response. The objective of this research was to characterize gene expression in pigs (Sus scrofa) naturally and experimentally infected with A. phagocytophilum trying to identify mechanisms that help to explain low infection prevalence in this species. RESULTS For gene expression analysis in naturally infected pigs, microarray hybridization was used. The expression of differentially expressed immune response genes was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR in naturally and experimentally infected pigs. Results suggested that A. phagocytophilum infection affected cytoskeleton rearrangement and increased both innate and adaptive immune responses by up regulation of interleukin 1 receptor accessory protein-like 1 (IL1RAPL1), T-cell receptor alpha chain (TCR-alpha), thrombospondin 4 (TSP-4) and Gap junction protein alpha 1 (GJA1) genes. Higher serum levels of IL-1 beta, IL-8 and TNF-alpha in infected pigs when compared to controls supported data obtained at the mRNA level. CONCLUSIONS These results suggested that pigs are susceptible to A. phagocytophilum but control infection, particularly through activation of innate immune responses, phagocytosis and autophagy. This fact may account for the low infection prevalence detected in pigs in some regions and thus their low or no impact as a reservoir host for this pathogen. These results advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms at the host-pathogen interface and suggested a role for newly reported genes in the protection of pigs against A. phagocytophilum.
  • Publication
    Tonsils of the soft palate do not mediate the response of pigs to oral vaccination with heat-inactivated Mycobacterium bovis
    (American Society for Microbiology, 2014-08) Beltrán-Beck, Beatriz; Boadella, Mariana; Casal, Carmen; Bezos Garrido, Javier; Mazariegos Martínez-Peñalver, María; Martín, MariPaz; Galindo, Ruth C; Pérez de la Lastra, José M; Villar, Margarita; Garrido, Joseba M; Sevilla, Iker A; Asensio, Fernando; Sicilia, Javier; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P; Juste, Ramón A; de la Fuente, José; Gortázar, Christian; Domínguez Rodríguez, Lucas José; Romero Martínez, Beatriz
    Mycobacterium bovis causes animal tuberculosis (TB) in cattle, humans, and other mammalian species, including pigs. The goal of this study was to experimentally assess the responses of pigs with and without a history of tonsillectomy to oral vaccination with heat-inactivated M. bovis and challenge with a virulent M. bovis field strain, to compare pig and wild boar responses using the same vaccination model as previously used in the Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa), to evaluate the use of several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and lateral flow tests for in vivo TB diagnosis in pigs, and to verify if these tests are influenced by oral vaccination with inactivated M. bovis. At necropsy, the lesion and culture scores were 20% to 43% higher in the controls than those in the vaccinated pigs. Massive M. bovis growth from thoracic tissue samples was observed in 4 out of 9 controls but in none of the 10 vaccinated pigs. No effect of the presence or absence of tonsils was observed on these scores, suggesting that tonsils are not involved in the protective response to this vaccine in pigs. The serum antibody levels increased significantly only after challenge. At necropsy, the estimated sensitivities of the ELISAs and dual path platform (DPP) assays ranged from 89% to 94%. In the oral mucosa, no differences in gene expression were observed in the control group between the pigs with and without tonsils. In the vaccinated group, the mRNA levels for chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 7 (CCR7), interferon beta (IFN-β), and methylmalonyl coenzyme A mutase (MUT) were higher in pigs with tonsils. Complement component 3 mRNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) increased with vaccination and decreased after M. bovis challenge. This information is relevant for pig production in regions that are endemic for M. bovis and for TB vaccine research.
  • Publication
    Infequus: plataforma de enfermedades infecciosas equinas
    (2019-04-12) de Juan Ferré, Lucía; Briones Dieste, Víctor; Bezos Garrido, Javier; Forés Jackson, Paloma; Camino Gutiérrez, Eliazar; Buendía Andrés, Aranzazu; Dorrego Rodríguez, Abel; Cruz López, Fatima; González Domínguez, Sergio; Romero Martínez, Beatriz; García Benzaquén, Nerea; Bárcena Asensio, Carmen; Mazariegos Martínez-Peñalver, María; Ancochea Nodal, Carlos; Hernández Carrillo, Javier; Pérez Sancho, Marta; Pérez Sancho, Marta
    Desarrollo de la herramienta de formación online Infequus, que ofrecerá a los alumnos y profesionales información actualizada sobre el diagnóstico y control de las enfermedades infecciosas en la especie equina.