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Early Pleistocene faunivorous hominins were not kleptoparasitic, and this impacted the evolution of human anatomy and socio-ecology

dc.contributor.authorDomínguez Rodrigo, Manuel
dc.contributor.authorBaquedano, Enrique
dc.contributor.authorOrganista, Elia
dc.contributor.authorCobo Sánchez, Lucía
dc.contributor.authorMabulla, Audax
dc.contributor.authorMaskara, Vivek
dc.contributor.authorGidna, Agnes
dc.contributor.authorPizarro Monzo, Marcos
dc.contributor.authorAramendi, Julia
dc.contributor.authorGalán Abellán, Ana Belén
dc.contributor.authorCifuentes Alcobendas, Gabriel
dc.contributor.authorVegara Riquelme, Marina
dc.contributor.authorJiménez García, Blanca
dc.contributor.authorAbellán, Natalia
dc.contributor.authorBarba, Rebeca
dc.contributor.authorUribelarrea del Val, David
dc.contributor.authorMartín Perea, David Manuel
dc.contributor.authorDíez Martín, Fernando
dc.contributor.authorMaíllo Fernández, José Manuel
dc.contributor.authorRodríguez Hidalgo, Antonio
dc.contributor.authorCourtenay, Lloyd A.
dc.contributor.authorMora, Rocío
dc.contributor.authorMaté González, Miguel Ángel
dc.contributor.authorGonzález Aguilera, Diego
dc.date.accessioned2023-06-16T14:22:18Z
dc.date.available2023-06-16T14:22:18Z
dc.date.issued2021-08-09
dc.description.abstractHumans are unique in their diet, physiology and socio-reproductive behavior compared to other primates. They are also unique in the ubiquitous adaptation to all biomes and habitats. From an evolutionary perspective, these trends seem to have started about two million years ago, coinciding with the emergence of encephalization, the reduction of the dental apparatus, the adoption of a fully terrestrial lifestyle, resulting in the emergence of the modern anatomical bauplan, the focalization of certain activities in the landscape, the use of stone tools, and the exit from Africa. It is in this period that clear taphonomic evidence of a switch in diet with respect to Pliocene hominins occurred, with the adoption of carnivory. Until now, the degree of carnivorism in early humans remained controversial. A persistent hypothesis is that hominins acquired meat irregularly (potentially as fallback food) and opportunistically through klepto-foraging. Here, we test this hypothesis and show, in contrast, that the butchery practices of early Pleistocene hominins (unveiled through systematic study of the patterning and intensity of cut marks on their prey) could not have resulted from having frequent secondary access to carcasses. We provide evidence of hominin primary access to animal resources and emphasize the role that meat played in their diets, their ecology and their anatomical evolution, ultimately resulting in the ecologically unrestricted terrestrial adaptation of our species. This has major implications to the evolution of human physiology and potentially for the evolution of the human brain.
dc.description.departmentDepto. de Geodinámica, Estratigrafía y Paleontología
dc.description.facultyFac. de Ciencias Geológicas
dc.description.refereedTRUE
dc.description.sponsorshipMinisterio de Ciencia e Innovación (MICINN)
dc.description.sponsorshipSwedish Research Council
dc.description.sponsorshipBanco de Santander
dc.description.sponsorshipPalarq Foundation
dc.description.sponsorshipE2in2
dc.description.sponsorshipCOSTECH
dc.description.sponsorshipNgorongoro Conservation Area Authority
dc.description.sponsorshipTanzanian National Parks
dc.description.statuspub
dc.eprint.idhttps://eprints.ucm.es/id/eprint/71793
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-021-94783-4
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.officialurlhttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-94783-4
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14352/4850
dc.issue.number16135
dc.journal.titleScientific reports
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherNature publishing group
dc.relation.projectIDHAR2017- 82463-C4-1-P
dc.relation.projectIDAR-HS 2018-01045-3
dc.relation.projectID190-NA- 2006-115
dc.relation.projectID135/250/01
dc.relation.projectID148-ER-2006-115
dc.rightsAtribución 3.0 España
dc.rights.accessRightsopen access
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/es/
dc.subject.cdu569.89
dc.subject.ucmPaleontología
dc.subject.unesco2416 Paleontología
dc.titleEarly Pleistocene faunivorous hominins were not kleptoparasitic, and this impacted the evolution of human anatomy and socio-ecology
dc.typejournal article
dc.volume.number11
dspace.entity.typePublication
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relation.isAuthorOfPublication1da0f02d-66a0-4d38-9070-0a66e2797128
relation.isAuthorOfPublicationcb6b5c9c-8afe-401a-bfa7-5dd7c301ac93
relation.isAuthorOfPublication.latestForDiscoverya3e60dc3-0b97-4d14-8cf6-76861823e7dd
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